Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2016 Sep;101(5):F401-3. doi: 10.1136/archdischild-2015-309328. Epub 2015 Dec 17.

High-flow support in very preterm infants in Australia and New Zealand.

Author information

1
Newborn Research Centre and Neonatal Services, The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Critical Care and Neurosciences Division, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia.
2
Newborn Research Centre and Neonatal Services, The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Paediatric Infant & Perinatal Emergency Retrieval, The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia.
3
Newborn Research Centre and Neonatal Services, The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Randomised trials suggest that high-flow (HF) therapy is comparable with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for postextubation respiratory support in neonates, and HF has been widely adopted in neonatal intensive care.

METHODS:

We conducted a population-based study of very preterm infants born <32 weeks' gestation within the Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network (ANZNN) data set from 2009 to 2012, who received respiratory support with HF.

RESULTS:

3372 very preterm infants were treated with HF. HF use in this population increased significantly from 15% in 2009 to 35% in 2012. In 2012, 53% (542/1029) of extremely preterm infants born <28 weeks' gestation received HF. 98% (3308/3372) of infants had received endotracheal ventilation or CPAP prior to receiving HF. The maximum HF gas flow was ≤8 L/min in almost all infants.

CONCLUSIONS:

HF use in extremely preterm and very preterm infants increased significantly within the ANZNN from 2009 to 2012.

KEYWORDS:

Infant, premature; Non-invasive ventilation; Respiratory distress syndrome, newborn

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire
Loading ...
Support Center