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Science. 2016 Jan 1;351(6268):81-4. doi: 10.1126/science.aac8608. Epub 2015 Dec 17.

Co-circulation of three camel coronavirus species and recombination of MERS-CoVs in Saudi Arabia.

Author information

1
Biotechnology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
2
State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases (The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Branch), Shenzhen Third People's Hospital, Shenzhen, China. Shantou University-The University of Hong Kong Joint Institute of Virology, Shantou University, Shantou, China. Centre of Influenza Research and State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
3
Biotechnology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Department of Nucleic Acids Research, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Research Institute, City for Scientific Research and Technology Applications, Borg El-Arab, Post Office Box 21934, Alexandria, Egypt.
4
Shantou University-The University of Hong Kong Joint Institute of Virology, Shantou University, Shantou, China. Centre of Influenza Research and State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
5
Biotechnology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. Microbial Genetics Department, Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Division, National Research Center, Dokki, Giza, Egypt.
6
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, Riyadh 11442, Saudi Arabia.
7
Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia.
8
State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases (The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Branch), Shenzhen Third People's Hospital, Shenzhen, China.
9
Centre of Influenza Research and State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.
10
Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, Charles Perkins Centre, School of Biological Sciences and Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia.
11
State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases (The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Branch), Shenzhen Third People's Hospital, Shenzhen, China. Shantou University-The University of Hong Kong Joint Institute of Virology, Shantou University, Shantou, China. Centre of Influenza Research and State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. zhuhch@hku.hk yguan@hku.hk.
12
Biotechnology Research Group, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia. State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases (The University of Hong Kong-Shenzhen Branch), Shenzhen Third People's Hospital, Shenzhen, China. Shantou University-The University of Hong Kong Joint Institute of Virology, Shantou University, Shantou, China. Centre of Influenza Research and State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China. zhuhch@hku.hk yguan@hku.hk.

Abstract

Outbreaks of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) raise questions about the prevalence and evolution of the MERS coronavirus (CoV) in its animal reservoir. Our surveillance in Saudi Arabia in 2014 and 2015 showed that viruses of the MERS-CoV species and a human CoV 229E-related lineage co-circulated at high prevalence, with frequent co-infections in the upper respiratory tract of dromedary camels. viruses of the betacoronavirus 1 species, we found that dromedary camels share three CoV species with humans. Several MERS-CoV lineages were present in camels, including a recombinant lineage that has been dominant since December 2014 and that subsequently led to the human outbreaks in 2015. Camels therefore serve as an important reservoir for the maintenance and diversification of the MERS-CoVs and are the source of human infections with this virus.

PMID:
26678874
DOI:
10.1126/science.aac8608
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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