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Brain Imaging Behav. 2016 Dec;10(4):1264-1273.

Enlarged lateral ventricles inversely correlate with reduced corpus callosum central volume in first episode schizophrenia: association with functional measures.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, VA Boston Healthcare System, Brockton Division, Brockton, MA, USA. elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu.
2
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu.
3
Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu.
4
VA Boston Healthcare System, Brockton Division, Brockton, MA, USA. elisabetta_delre@hms.harvard.edu.
5
Laboratory of Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, VA Boston Healthcare System, Brockton Division, Brockton, MA, USA.
6
Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
7
Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
8
VA Boston Healthcare System, Brockton Division, Brockton, MA, USA.
9
Psychiatric and Neurodevelopmental Genetics Unit, Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
10
Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
11
Massachusetts Mental Health Center Division of Public Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.
12
Brigham and Women's Hospital, Connors Center for Women's Health and Gender Biology, Boston, MA, USA.
13
Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
14
Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Japan.
15
Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Abstract

The lateral and third ventricles, as well as the corpus callosum (CC), are known to be affected in schizophrenia. Here we investigate whether abnormalities in the lateral ventricles (LVs), third ventricle, and corpus callosum are related to one another in first episode schizophrenia (FESZ), and whether such abnormalities show progression over time. Nineteen FESZ and 19 age- and handedness-matched controls were included in the study. MR images were acquired on a 3-Tesla MRI at baseline and ~1.2 years later. FreeSurfer v.5.3 was employed for segmentation. Two-way or univariate ANCOVAs were used for statistical analysis, where the covariate was intracranial volume. Group and gender were included as between-subjects factors. Percent volume changes between baseline and follow-up were used to determine volume changes at follow-up. Bilateral LV and third ventricle volumes were significantly increased, while central CC volume was significantly decreased in patients compared to controls at baseline and at follow-up. In FESZ, the bilateral LV volume was also inversely correlated with volume of the central CC. This inverse correlation was not present in controls. In FESZ, an inverse correlation was found between percent volume increase from baseline to follow-up for bilateral LVs and lesser improvement in the Global Assessment of Functioning score. Significant correlations were observed for abnormalities of central CC, LVs and third ventricle volumes in FESZ, suggesting a common neurodevelopmental origin in schizophrenia. Enlargement of ventricles was associated with less improvement in global functioning over time.

KEYWORDS:

Corpus callosum; FreeSurfer; Multi-atlas brain masking; Neurodevelopment; Schizophrenia; Ventricles

PMID:
26678596
PMCID:
PMC5538144
DOI:
10.1007/s11682-015-9493-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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