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Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2015 Dec;148(6):982-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ajodo.2015.06.018.

Retrospective study of 100 autotransplanted teeth with complete root formation and subsequent orthodontic treatment.

Author information

1
Assistant professor, Orthodontic Science, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Junior associate professor, Orthodontic Science, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Clinical fellow, Orthodontic Science, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Postgraduate research student, Orthodontic Science, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Private practice, Tokyo, Japan.
6
Professor and chairman, Orthodontic Science, Department of Oral Health Sciences, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: t.ono.orts@tmd.ac.jp.
7
Professor emeritus, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Autotransplantation has become a major therapeutic option for replacing missing teeth in adult orthodontic patients. However, little systematic information is available about the long-term stability of autotransplanted teeth with complete root formation after the application of an orthodontic force. The objective of this study was to investigate the outcomes of autotransplanted teeth with complete root formation that underwent orthodontic treatment.

METHODS:

One hundred teeth, autotransplanted in 89 patients, were examined over a mean observation period of 5.8 years. Orthodontic force was applied with nickel-titanium wires 4 to 8 weeks after autotransplantation. Root resorption, ankylosis, mobility, pocket depth, and inflammation at the recipient site were investigated clinically and with radiographs.

RESULTS:

The survival rate of the autotransplanted teeth was 93.0%. Abnormal findings were found in 29 teeth, including 7 lost teeth, for a success rate of 71.0%. Donor tooth type and occlusal condition of the donor tooth before transplantation were associated with abnormal findings.

CONCLUSIONS:

The early application of orthodontic force may increase the success rate of autotransplanted teeth, and the type and presurgical occlusal condition of donor teeth affect the success rate.

PMID:
26672704
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajodo.2015.06.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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