Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2016 May;23(8):839-46. doi: 10.1177/2047487315621978. Epub 2015 Dec 16.

Tooth loss is independently associated with poor outcomes in stable coronary heart disease.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden ola.vedin@ucr.uu.se.
2
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Uppsala Clinical Research Center, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
3
Postgraduate Medical School, Grochowski Hospital, Warsaw, Poland.
4
Clinic of Cardiology, Medical Institute of Ministry of Interior, Sofia, Bulgaria.
5
Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
6
Department of Internal Medicine II-Cardiology, University of Ulm Medical Center, Ulm, Germany Deutsches Herzzentrum München, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Munich Heart Alliance, Munich, Germany.
7
Metabolic Pathways and Cardiovascular Therapeutic Area, GlaxoSmithKline, Pennsylvania, USA.
8
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
9
Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.
10
Green Lane Cardiovascular Service, Auckland City Hospital and University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
11
Department of Cardioresearch, Antonius Ziekenhuis Sneek, The Netherlands.
12
Tallinn University of Technology, North Estonia Medical Centre, Tallinn, Estonia.
13
University of Medicine and Pharmacy Carol Davila, University and Emergency Hospital, Bucharest, Romania.
14
Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated associations between self-reported tooth loss and cardiovascular outcomes in a global stable coronary heart disease cohort.

METHODS:

We examined 15,456 patients from 39 countries with stable coronary heart disease (prior myocardial infarction, prior revascularisation or multivessel coronary heart disease) in the STABILITY trial. At baseline, patients reported number of teeth (26-32 (all), 20-25, 15-19, 1-14 and no teeth) and were followed for 3.7 years. Cox regression models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic status, determined associations between tooth loss level (26-32 teeth: lowest level; no teeth: highest level) and cardiovascular outcomes.

RESULTS:

After adjustment, every increase in tooth loss level was associated with an increased risk of the primary outcome, the composite of cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and non-fatal stroke (hazard ratio 1.06; 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.10), cardiovascular death (1.17; 1.10-1.24), all-cause death (1.16; 1.11-1.22) and non-fatal or fatal stroke (1.14; 1.04-1.24), but not with non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction (0.99; 0.94-1.05). Having no teeth, compared to 26-32 teeth, entailed a significantly higher risk of the primary outcome (1.27 (1.08, 1.49)), cardiovascular death (1.85 (1.45, 2.37), all-cause death (1.81 (1.50, 2.20)) and stroke (1.67 (1.15, 2.39)).

CONCLUSIONS:

In this large global cohort of patients with coronary heart disease, self-reported tooth loss predicted adverse cardiovascular outcomes and all-cause death independent of cardiovascular risk factors and socioeconomic status.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00799903.

KEYWORDS:

Clinical trial registration: www.clinicaltrials.gov; NCT00799903; Tooth loss; prevention; risk prediction; stable coronary heart disease

PMID:
26672609
DOI:
10.1177/2047487315621978
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center