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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Dec 29;112(52):15798-802. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1514842112. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Dogs lap using acceleration-driven open pumping.

Author information

1
Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061;
2
School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
3
Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061; sunnyjsh@vt.edu.

Abstract

Dogs lap because they have incomplete cheeks and cannot suck. When lapping, a dog's tongue pulls a liquid column from the bath, suggesting that the hydrodynamics of column formation are critical to understanding how dogs drink. We measured lapping in 19 dogs and used the results to generate a physical model of the tongue's interaction with the air-fluid interface. These experiments help to explain how dogs exploit the fluid dynamics of the generated column. The results demonstrate that effects of acceleration govern lapping frequency, which suggests that dogs curl the tongue to create a larger liquid column. Comparing lapping in dogs and cats reveals that, despite similar morphology, these carnivores lap in different physical regimes: an unsteady inertial regime for dogs and steady inertial regime for cats.

KEYWORDS:

biomechanics; drinking; lapping; open pumping

PMID:
26668382
PMCID:
PMC4703018
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1514842112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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