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Pharmacol Rev. 2016 Jan;68(1):49-75. doi: 10.1124/pr.115.011106.

Emerging Roles of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor in Pathology: Toward New Paradigms in Clinical Pharmacology.

Author information

1
INSERM UMR 1138 Team 1, Cordeliers Research Center, Pierre et Marie Curie University, Paris, France (F.J., N.F); and University Paris-Est Creteil, Creteil, France (F.J.) frederic.jaisser@inserm.fr.
2
INSERM UMR 1138 Team 1, Cordeliers Research Center, Pierre et Marie Curie University, Paris, France (F.J., N.F); and University Paris-Est Creteil, Creteil, France (F.J.).

Abstract

The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and its ligand aldosterone are the principal modulators of hormone-regulated renal sodium reabsorption. In addition to the kidney, there are several other cells and organs expressing MR, in which its activation mediates pathologic changes, indicating potential therapeutic applications of pharmacological MR antagonism. Steroidal MR antagonists have been used for decades to fight hypertension and more recently heart failure. New therapeutic indications are now arising, and nonsteroidal MR antagonists are currently under development. This review is focused on nonclassic MR targets in cardiac, vascular, renal, metabolic, ocular, and cutaneous diseases. The MR, associated with other risk factors, is involved in organ fibrosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and aging; for example, in the kidney and heart MR mediates hormonal tissue-specific ion channel regulation. Genetic and epigenetic modifications of MR expression/activity that have been documented in hypertension may also present significant risk factors in other diseases and be susceptible to MR antagonism. Excess mineralocorticoid signaling, mediated by aldosterone or glucocorticoids binding, now appears deleterious in the progression of pathologies that may lead to end-stage organ failure and could therefore benefit from the repositioning of pharmacological MR antagonists.

PMID:
26668301
DOI:
10.1124/pr.115.011106
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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