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Community Ment Health J. 2016 Apr;52(3):251-61. doi: 10.1007/s10597-015-9957-2. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Stigma Related Avoidance in People Living with Severe Mental Illness (SMI): Findings of an Integrative Review.

Author information

1
MPH Program, University of Wisconsin Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA.
2
Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program, University of Wisconsin Madison School of Nursing, 4171 Signe Skott Cooper Hall, 701 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53705, USA.
3
Fordem Connections Community Support Programs, Journey Mental Health Center, West Washington Avenue, Madison, WI, USA.
4
Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program, University of Wisconsin Madison School of Nursing, 4171 Signe Skott Cooper Hall, 701 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53705, USA. linda.oakley@wisc.edu.
5
Department of Health Sciences Library, University of Wisconsin Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 750 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53705, USA.

Abstract

The purpose of this integrative review is to synthesize primary evidence of the impact of internalized stigma on avoidance in adult community treatment patients living with SMI. A keyword database search of articles published through 2015 yielded 21 papers and a total of 4256 patients. Our analyses found that stigmatizing beliefs associated with avoidance are related to significant loss of self-esteem. Factors generally thought to reduce stigma internalized as self-stigmatizing beliefs, such as improved insight, increased self-awareness, and psycho-education to improve stigma coping skills, do not appear to improve self-esteem.

KEYWORDS:

Avoidance; Self-esteem; Severe mental illness; Stigma

PMID:
26668008
DOI:
10.1007/s10597-015-9957-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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