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Int J Sports Med. 2016 Apr;37(4):295-304. doi: 10.1055/s-0035-1564254. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Short-term Recovery Following Resistance Exercise Leading or not to Failure.

Author information

1
Sports and Athletic Performance Research Centre. Faculty of Sport. Pablo de Olavide University, Seville, Spain.
2
Instituto Navarro de Deporte y Juventud (INDJ), Studies, Research and Sports Medicine Centre, Pamplona, Spain.
3
Medical Physiology and Biophysics Department. University of Seville, Spain.
4
Junta de Andalucía, Centro Andaluz de Medicina del Deporte, Seville, Spain.

Abstract

This study analyzed the time course of recovery following 2 resistance exercise protocols differing in level of effort: maximum (to failure) vs. half-maximum number of repetitions per set. 9 males performed 3 sets of 4 vs. 8 repetitions with their 80% 1RM load, 3×4(8) vs. 3×8(8), in the bench press and squat. Several time-points from 24 h pre- to 48 h post-exercise were established to assess the mechanical (countermovement jump height, CMJ; velocity against the 1 m·s(-1) load, V1-load), biochemical (testosterone, cortisol, GH, prolactin, IGF-1, CK) and heart rate variability (HRV) and complexity (HRC) response to exercise. 3×8(8) resulted in greater neuromuscular fatigue (higher reductions in repetition velocity and velocity against V1-load) than 3×4(8). CMJ remained reduced up to 48 h post-exercise following 3×8(8), whereas it was recovered after 6 h for 3×4(8). Significantly greater prolactin and IGF-1 levels were found for 3×8(8) vs. 3×4(8). Significant reductions in HRV and HRC were observed for 3×8(8) vs. 3×4(8) in the immediate recovery. Performing a half-maximum number of repetitions per set resulted in: 1) a stimulus of faster mean repetition velocities; 2) lower impairment of neuromuscular performance and faster recovery; 3) reduced hormonal response and muscle damage; and 4) lower reduction in HRV and HRC following exercise.

PMID:
26667923
DOI:
10.1055/s-0035-1564254
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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