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J Clin Psychol Med Settings. 2016 Jun;23(2):112-25. doi: 10.1007/s10880-015-9448-1.

Factors Associated with Recruitment and Retention in Randomized Controlled Trials of Behavioral Interventions for Patients with Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes.

Author information

1
Center for Translational Science, Children's National Health System, 111 Michigan Ave, NW, Washington, DC, 20010, USA. lherbert@childrensnational.org.
2
Center for Translational Science, Children's National Health System, 111 Michigan Ave, NW, Washington, DC, 20010, USA.
3
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics and Pediatrics, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to describe recruitment and retention experiences from three behavioral randomized controlled trials conducted among youth with type 1 diabetes. Eligibility, recruitment, and retention data were examined. Study-specific differential study participation and loss-to-follow-up analyses assessed the relations of patient characteristics with treatment completion and 6-month retention. Multivariable logistic regression identified factors independently associated with 6-month retention among all participants. Approximately 70-92 % of randomized participants completed treatment and 58-90 % were retained for follow-up. Older patients and non-Caucasian patients were less likely to enroll. Treatment completion and 6-month retention were less likely among youth who were older, had worse baseline glycemic control, lower household income, and/or unmarried parents. Some subgroups of patients are less likely to participate in research and are more susceptible to loss-to-follow-up. More work is needed to understand the facilitators and barriers to research participation.

KEYWORDS:

Randomized controlled trials; Recruitment; Retention; Type 1 diabetes

PMID:
26661924
DOI:
10.1007/s10880-015-9448-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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