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Health Educ Res. 2016 Feb;31(1):24-35. doi: 10.1093/her/cyv066. Epub 2015 Dec 10.

Do partial home smoking bans signal progress toward a smoke-free home?

Author information

1
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory Prevention Research Center, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, mkegler@emory.edu.
2
Department of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education, Emory Prevention Research Center, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322.
3
School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston, TX 77030.
4
Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27510 and.
5
Center for Behavioral Epidemiology and Community Health, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 91941, USA.

Abstract

Understanding who establishes partial home smoking bans, what these bans cover, and whether they are an intermediate step in going smoke-free would help to inform smoke-free home interventions. Participants were recruited from United Way of Greater Atlanta's 2-1-1 contact center. Data were collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months via telephone interview. Participants (n = 375) were mostly African American (84.2%) and female (84.3%). The majority (58.5%) had annual household incomes <$10,000. At baseline, 61.3% reported a partial smoking ban and 38.7% reported no ban. Existence of a partial ban as compared with no ban was associated with being female, having more than a high school education, being married and younger age. Partial bans most often meant smoking was allowed only in designated rooms (52.6%). Other common rules included: no smoking in the presence of children (18.4%) and smoking allowed only in combination with actions such as opening a window or running a fan (9.8%). A higher percentage of households with partial bans at baseline were smoke-free at 6 months (36.5%) compared with households with no bans at baseline (22.1%). Households with partial smoking bans may have a higher level of readiness to go smoke-free than households with no restrictions.

PMID:
26661723
PMCID:
PMC4883035
DOI:
10.1093/her/cyv066
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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