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J Cereb Blood Flow Metab. 2016 Mar;36(3):513-38. doi: 10.1177/0271678X15617172. Epub 2015 Nov 16.

Molecular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA Jesse.Stokum@som.umaryland.edu.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, USA.

Abstract

Advancements in molecular biology have led to a greater understanding of the individual proteins responsible for generating cerebral edema. In large part, the study of cerebral edema is the study of maladaptive ion transport. Following acute CNS injury, cells of the neurovascular unit, particularly brain endothelial cells and astrocytes, undergo a program of pre- and post-transcriptional changes in the activity of ion channels and transporters. These changes can result in maladaptive ion transport and the generation of abnormal osmotic forces that, ultimately, manifest as cerebral edema. This review discusses past models and current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular pathophysiology of cerebral edema.

KEYWORDS:

Astrocytes; brain edema; capillaries; cerebrospinal fluid; endothelium

PMID:
26661240
PMCID:
PMC4776312
DOI:
10.1177/0271678X15617172
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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