Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Patient Educ Couns. 2016 May;99(5):739-46. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2015.11.019. Epub 2015 Dec 2.

When do cancer patients regret their treatment decision? A path analysis of the influence of clinicians' communication styles and the match of decision-making styles on decision regret.

Author information

1
Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany; Psychology III, University of Mannheim, Germany. Electronic address: nicolai@uni-mannheim.de.
2
Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany.
3
Department of General Internal Medicine and Psychosomatics, Center for Psychosocial Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany.
4
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Freiburg, Germany.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test the influence of physician empathy (PE), shared decision making (SDM), and the match between patients' preferred and perceived decision-making styles on patients' decision regret.

METHODS:

Patients with breast or colon cancer (n=71) completed questionnaires immediately following (T1) and three months after a consultation (T2). Path analysis was used to examine the relationships among patient demographics, patient reports of PE, SDM, the match between preferred and perceived decision-making styles, and patient decision regret at T2.

RESULTS:

After controlling for clinician clusters, higher PE was directly associated with more SDM (β=0.43, p<0.01) and lower decision regret (β=-0.28, p<0.01). The match between patients' preferred and perceived roles was negatively associated with decision regret (β=-0.33, p<0.01). Patients who participated less than desired reported more decision regret at T2. There was no significant association between SDM and decision regret (β=0.03, p=0.74).

CONCLUSION:

PE and the match between patients' preferred and perceived roles in medical decision making are essential for patient-centered cancer consultations and treatment decisions.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Ways to enhance PE and matching the consultation style to patients' expectations should be encouraged.

KEYWORDS:

Decision-making style; Empathy; Patient involvement; Patient preferences; Physician–patient communication; Shared decision making

PMID:
26658703
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2015.11.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center