Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Physiol Behav. 2016 Mar 1;155:131-40. doi: 10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.11.032. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

Fatty acid amide supplementation decreases impulsivity in young adult heavy drinkers.

Author information

1
The John B Pierce Laboratory, 290 Congress Ave, New Haven, CT 06519, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; University of Groningen, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands.
2
The John B Pierce Laboratory, 290 Congress Ave, New Haven, CT 06519, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.
4
The John B Pierce Laboratory, 290 Congress Ave, New Haven, CT 06519, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, 300 George St, New Haven, CT 06511, USA; University of Cologne, Albertus-Magnus-Platz, 09235 Köln, Germany. Electronic address: dana.small@yale.edu.

Abstract

Compromised dopamine signaling in the striatum has been associated with the expression of impulsive behaviors in addiction, obesity and alcoholism. In rodents, intragastric infusion of the fatty acid amide oleoylethanolamide increases striatal extracellular dopamine levels via vagal afferent signaling. Here we tested whether supplementation with PhosphoLean™, a dietary supplement that contains the precursor of the fatty acid amide oleoylethanolamide (N-oleyl-phosphatidylethanolamine), would reduce impulsive responding and alcohol use in heavy drinking young adults. Twenty-two individuals were assigned to a three-week supplementation regimen with PhosphoLean™ or placebo. Impulsivity was assessed with self-report questionnaires and behavioral tasks pre- and post-supplementation. Although self-report measures of impulsivity did not change, supplementation with PhosphoLean™, but not placebo, significantly reduced false alarm rate on a Go/No-Go task. In addition, an association was found between improved sensitivity on the Go/No-Go task and reduced alcohol intake. These findings provide preliminary evidence that promoting fatty acid derived gut-brain dopamine communication may have therapeutic potential for reducing impulsivity in heavy drinkers.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Dopamine; Go/No-Go task; Impulsivity; Inhibitory control; OEA

PMID:
26656766
PMCID:
PMC4718847
[Available on 2017-03-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.physbeh.2015.11.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center