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J Biol Rhythms. 2016 Feb;31(1):108-11. doi: 10.1177/0748730415621412. Epub 2015 Dec 8.

Real-Time Recording of Circadian Per1 and Per2 Expression in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus of Freely Moving Rats.

Author information

1
Department of Systems Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan yoshiy@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp okamurah@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Systems Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.
3
Department of Systems Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama, Japan.
4
Department of Electronics and Intelligent Systems, Tohoku Institute of Technology, Sendai, Japan.
5
Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan.
6
Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kinki University, Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

Measuring real-time gene activity in the brains of freely moving animals presents a challenging issue in neuroscience research. Circadian gene expression in neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a small nucleus in the hypothalamus, is reflected in behavioral rhythmicity. Cellular oscillatory gene expression is generated by a transcription-translation feedback loop of clock genes including 2 oscillatory genes, Per1 and Per2. Here we have succeeded in real-time monitoring of Per1 and Per2 transcription separately by detecting the bioluminescence of luciferase (luc) reporters using a plastic optical fiber inserted into the SCN of freely moving rats. Per1-luc and Per2-luc rhythms peaked in the middle and late subjective day, respectively, which was confirmed by quantitative PCR-based measurements of SCN tissue samples. Studies of in vivo transcriptional states of clock genes in freely moving animals should improve our understanding of how clock gene expression is reflected in behavior.

KEYWORDS:

circadian; clock gene; optical fiber; period; real-time monitoring; suprachiasmatic nucleus

PMID:
26656624
DOI:
10.1177/0748730415621412
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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