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Psychiatry Res. 2016 Jan 30;235:77-82. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.11.046. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

Non-suicidal self-injury and suicidal ideation in relation to eating and general psychopathology among college-age women.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. Electronic address: deichen@ucsd.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
4
PGSP-Stanford PsyD Consortium, Palo Alto, CA, USA.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.
6
Department of Psychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA; Center for M-Health, Palo Alto University, Palo Alto, CA, USA.

Abstract

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) and suicidal ideation are potent risk factors for suicide and are associated with general and eating disorder-specific psychopathology. Limited research has examined the effects of combined NSSI+suicidal ideation thus concurrent examination is needed to understand potential differential effects on psychopathology. College-aged women (N=508) completed self-report measures of NSSI, suicidal ideation, general psychopathology, and Eating Disorder-specific psychopathology. MANOVAs determined whether the NSSI/SI status groups differed on general and eating disorder pathology measures as a set. Significant MANOVAs were followed up with univariate ANOVAs and posthoc tests. Thirteen women endorsed NSSI+Suicidal Ideation, 70 endorsed NSSI-only, 25 endorsed Suicidal Ideation-only, and 400 endorsed no NSSI/Suicidal Ideation. Both general and eating disorder-specific psychopathology differed across groups. NSSI+Suicidal Ideation and Suicidal Ideation-only groups typically endorsed higher general psychopathology than the no NSSI/Suicidal Ideation and NSSI-only groups. Regarding eating disorder pathology, the NSSI+Suicidal Ideation group was more pathological than no NSSI/Suicidal Ideation and NSSI-only, except on the weight concerns scale, where NSSI+Suicidal Ideation only differed from no NSSI/Suicidal Ideation. The NSSI+Suicidal Ideation group was only greater than Suicidal Ideation-only on measures of depression and eating concern. Results highlight the importance of screening for both NSSI and suicidal ideation, especially for individuals with eating disorder symptoms. Likewise, screening for eating disorder pathology may be beneficial for individuals presenting with NSSI and suicidal ideation.

KEYWORDS:

Comorbidity; Depression; Eating disorders; Suicide

PMID:
26654754
PMCID:
PMC4724479
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2015.11.046
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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