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Presse Med. 2016 Jan;45(1):7-19. doi: 10.1016/j.lpm.2015.10.016. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

[The potential role of microbiota in major psychiatric disorders: Mechanisms, preclinical data, gastro-intestinal comorbidities and therapeutic options].

[Article in French]

Author information

1
Inserm U955, équipe 15, université Paris-Est, fondation FondaMental, fondation de coopération scientifique, AP-HP, groupe hospitalo-universitaire Mondor, DHU Pe-Psy, hôpital A.-Chenevier, pôle de psychiatrie et d'addictologie, pavillon Hartmann, 40, rue de Mesly, 94000 Créteil, France. Electronic address: guillaume.fond@gmail.com.
2
Institut Pasteur, unité de développement du tissu lymphoïde, 25, rue du Dr-Roux, 75724 Paris, France.
3
Inserm U955, équipe 15, université Paris-Est, fondation FondaMental, fondation de coopération scientifique, AP-HP, groupe hospitalo-universitaire Mondor, DHU Pe-Psy, hôpital A.-Chenevier, pôle de psychiatrie et d'addictologie, pavillon Hartmann, 40, rue de Mesly, 94000 Créteil, France.

Abstract

While forecasts predict an increase in the prevalence of mental health disorders in the worldwide general population, the response rate to classical psychiatric treatment remains unsatisfactory. Resistance to psychotropic drugs can be due to clinical, pharmacological, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic factors. Among these factors, recent animal findings suggest that microbiota may have an underestimated influence on its host's behavior and on drug metabolism that may explain ineffectiveness or increased side effects of psychiatric medications such as weight gain. The following issues were identified in the present review: (i) microbiota dysbiosis and putative consequences on central nervous system functioning; (ii) chronic microbiota dysbiosis-associated illnesses in humans; (iii) microbiota-oriented treatments and their potential therapeutic applications in psychiatry.

PMID:
26653939
DOI:
10.1016/j.lpm.2015.10.016
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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