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CJEM. 2016 Jul;18(4):283-7. doi: 10.1017/cem.2015.111. Epub 2015 Dec 14.

Stroke Education in Canadian Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

Author information

1
*Department of Emergency Medicine,Kelowna General Hospital,Kelowna, BC.
2
‡Division of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine,University of British Columbia,Vancouver, BC.
3
§Department of Family Practice,University of British Columbia,Vancouver, BC.
4
†Department of Emergency Medicine,University of British Columbia,Vancouver, BC.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) are common disorders treated by Canadian emergency physicians. The diagnosis and management of these conditions is time-sensitive and complex, requiring that emergency physicians have adequate training. This study sought to determine the extent of stroke and TIA training in Canadian emergency medicine residency programs.

METHODS:

A two-page survey was emailed to directors of all English-speaking emergency medicine residency programs in Canada. This included both the Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada (FRCPC) and the College of Family Physicians Enhanced Training [CCFP(EM)] residency programs. The number of mandatory and elective rotations, lectures, and examinations relevant to stroke and TIA were assessed.

RESULTS:

Nine FRCPC programs responded (of 11; RR=82%) and 11 CCFP(EM) programs responded (of 18; RR=61%), representing 20 of 29 programs in Canada (RR: 20/29=69%). Mandatory general neurology (3/9) and stroke neurology (2/9) rotations were offered in a minority of FRCPC programs and not at all in CCFP(EM) programs (0/11). Neuroradiology rotations were mandatory in 1/9 FRCPC programs and no CCFP(EM) programs (0/11). Acute ischemic stroke was allocated 3 hours of lecture time per year in all residency programs, regardless of route of training. Despite the fact that 100% of respondents train residents in facilities that administer thrombolysis for stroke, only 1/11 (9%) CCFP(EM) programs and 0/9 FRCPC programs have residents act as stroke team leaders.

CONCLUSIONS:

Formal training in stroke and TIA is limited in Canadian emergency medicine residency programs. Enhanced training opportunities should be developed as this disease is sudden, life-threatening, and can have disabling or fatal consequences, and therapeutic options are time sensitive.

KEYWORDS:

emergency medicine; medical education; stroke; transient ischemic attack

PMID:
26653775
DOI:
10.1017/cem.2015.111
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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