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Nutr J. 2015 Dec 12;14:124. doi: 10.1186/s12937-015-0114-0.

Are restrictive guidelines for added sugars science based?

Author information

1
Food Science and Nutrition Department, University of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Ave, St Paul, MN, 55108, USA.
2
Food Science and Nutrition Department, University of Minnesota, 1334 Eckles Ave, St Paul, MN, 55108, USA. jslavin@umn.edu.

Abstract

Added sugar regulations and recommendations have been proposed by policy makers around the world. With no universal definition, limited access to added sugar values in food products and no analytical difference from intrinsic sugars, added sugar recommendations present a unique challenge. Average added sugar intake by American adults is approximately 13% of total energy intake, and recommendations have been made as low 5% of total energy intake. In addition to public health recommendations, the Food and Drug Administration has proposed the inclusion of added sugar data to the Nutrition and Supplemental Facts Panel. The adoption of such regulations would have implications for both consumers as well as the food industry. There are certainly advantages to including added sugar data to the Nutrition Facts Panel; however, consumer research does not consistently show the addition of this information to improve consumer knowledge. With excess calorie consumption resulting in weight gain and increased risk of obesity and obesity related co-morbidities, added sugar consumption should be minimized. However, there is currently no evidence stating that added sugar is more harmful than excess calories from any other food source. The addition of restrictive added sugar recommendations may not be the most effective intervention in the treatment and prevention of obesity and other health concerns.

PMID:
26652250
PMCID:
PMC4676859
DOI:
10.1186/s12937-015-0114-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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