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Brain Connect. 2016 Apr;6(3):225-37. doi: 10.1089/brain.2015.0369. Epub 2016 Mar 7.

Propofol-Induced Frontal Cortex Disconnection: A Study of Resting-State Networks, Total Brain Connectivity, and Mean BOLD Signal Oscillation Frequencies.

Author information

1
1 Coma Science Group, Cyclotron Research Center, CHU University Hospital, University of Liège , Liège, Belgium .
2
2 Computer Imaging and Medical Applications Laboratory, National University of Colombia , Bogotá, Colombia .
3
3 MoVeRe Group, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège , Liège, Belgium .
4
4 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brain and Mind Institute, University of Western Ontario , London, Ontario, Canada .
5
5 Department of Neurology, CHU University Hospital, University of Liège , Liège, Belgium .
6
6 Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, CHU University Hospital, University of Liège , Liège, Belgium .
7
7 Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, CHR Hospital Citadelle , Liège, Belgium .
8
8 Department of Algology and Palliative Care, CHU University Hospital, University of Liège , Liège, Belgium .
9
9 Department of Neurology, University of Wisconsin , Madison, Wisconsin.
10
10 Department of Psychology, Brain and Mind Institute, University of Western Ontario , London, Ontario, Canada .
11
11 Department of Computer Science, Central University of Colombia , Bogotá, Colombia .

Abstract

Propofol is one of the most commonly used anesthetics in the world, but much remains unknown about the mechanisms by which it induces loss of consciousness. In this resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we examined qualitative and quantitative changes of resting-state networks (RSNs), total brain connectivity, and mean oscillation frequencies of the regional blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal, associated with propofol-induced mild sedation and loss of responsiveness in healthy subjects. We found that detectability of RSNs diminished significantly with loss of responsiveness, and total brain connectivity decreased strongly in the frontal cortex, which was associated with increased mean oscillation frequencies of the BOLD signal. Our results suggest a pivotal role of the frontal cortex in propofol-induced loss of responsiveness.

KEYWORDS:

consciousness; mean BOLD signal oscillation frequency; propofol; resting-state fMRI; total brain connectivity

PMID:
26650183
DOI:
10.1089/brain.2015.0369
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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