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Brain Struct Funct. 2016 Nov;221(8):4221-4234. Epub 2015 Dec 9.

Deep sleep divides the cortex into opposite modes of anatomical-functional coupling.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology and Brain Imaging Center, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main. Frankfurt am Main, 60528, Frankfurt Am Main, Germany. tagliazucchi.enzo@googlemail.com.
2
Institute for Medical Psychology, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, 24105, Kiel, Germany. tagliazucchi.enzo@googlemail.com.
3
Department of Psychosis Studies, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neurosciences, King's College London, WC2R 2LS, London, UK.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, CB2 2QQ, Cambridge, UK.
5
Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, CB21 5EF, Cambridge, UK.
6
GlaxoSmithKline, Alternative Discovery and Development, TW8 9GS, Brentford, UK.
7
Department of Neurology and Brain Imaging Center, Goethe University Frankfurt am Main. Frankfurt am Main, 60528, Frankfurt Am Main, Germany.
8
Department of Neurology, Christian Albrechts University Kiel, 24104, Kiel, Germany.
9
Department of Neurology, UKSH, Arnold-Heller-Stra├če 3, 24105, Kiel, Germany.

Abstract

The coupling of anatomical and functional connectivity at rest suggests that anatomy is essential for wake-typical activity patterns. Here, we study the development of this coupling from wakefulness to deep sleep. Globally, similarity between whole-brain anatomical and functional connectivity networks increased during deep sleep. Regionally, we found differential coupling: during sleep, functional connectivity of primary cortices resembled more the underlying anatomical connectivity, while we observed the opposite in associative cortices. Increased anatomical-functional similarity in sensory areas is consistent with their stereotypical, cross-modal response to the environment during sleep. In distinction, looser coupling-relative to wakeful rest-in higher order integrative cortices suggests that sleep actively disrupts default patterns of functional connectivity in regions essential for the conscious access of information and that anatomical connectivity acts as an anchor for the restoration of their functionality upon awakening.

KEYWORDS:

Anatomical connectivity; Consciousness; Functional connectivity; Sleep

PMID:
26650048
DOI:
10.1007/s00429-015-1162-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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