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Mov Disord. 2016 Mar;31(3):384-92. doi: 10.1002/mds.26454. Epub 2015 Dec 9.

Increased beta rhythm as an indicator of inhibitory mechanisms in tourette syndrome.

Author information

1
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, Medical Faculty, Düsseldorf University, Düsseldorf, Germany.
2
Department of Psychology, Hamburg University, Hamburg, Germany.
3
Department of Neurology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany.
4
Danish Research Center for Magnetic Resonance, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
5
Department of Neurology, Copenhagen University Hospital Bispebjerg.
6
Clinic of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
7
Department of Pediatric and Adult Movement Disorders and Neuropsychiatry, University of Lübeck.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Inhibitory oscillatory mechanisms subserving tic compensation have been put forward in Tourette syndrome. Modulation of the beta rhythm (15-25 Hz) as the well-established oscillatory movement execution-inhibition indicator was tested during a cognitive-motor task in patients with Tourette syndrome.

METHODS:

Performing a Go/NoGo task, 12 patients with Tourette syndrome and 12 matched controls were recorded using whole-head magnetoencephalography.

RESULTS:

Compared to healthy participants, patients showed less beta suppression in the sensorimotor area and enhanced beta power in parieto-occipital brain regions contralaterally to the response hand. Average beta power and power gain correlated negatively with tic severity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased motor inhibitory as well as visuomotor attentional processes are likely to subserve tic compensation. Correlational results suggest that stronger inhibitory compensation accompanies less tic severity.

KEYWORDS:

Tourette syndrome; attention; beta; inhibition; oscillations

PMID:
26649991
DOI:
10.1002/mds.26454
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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