Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Opin Genet Dev. 2015 Dec;35:100-9. doi: 10.1016/j.gde.2015.10.008. Epub 2015 Nov 30.

Genomics and the making of yeast biodiversity.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Genetics, Genome Center of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Energy Institute, J.F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA; DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA. Electronic address: cthittinger@wisc.edu.
2
Department of Biological Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235, USA.
3
State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China.
4
State Key Laboratory of Mycology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China; CBS-KNAW Fungal Biodiversity Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Medical Mycology, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China.
5
UCIBIO-REQUIMTE, Departamento de Ciências da Vida, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica, Portugal.
6
Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
7
Laboratory of Genetics, Genome Center of Wisconsin, Wisconsin Energy Institute, J.F. Crow Institute for the Study of Evolution, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA.
8
Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 5B7, Canada.
9
Laboratorio de Microbiología Aplicada y Biotecnología, Instituto de Investigaciones en Biodiversidad y Medioambiente (INIBIOMA), UNComahue-CONICET, Bariloche, Argentina.
10
Department of Microbiology, ICB, Federal University of Minas Gerais, C.P. 486, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901, Brazil.
11
Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens and Mycology Research Unit, National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research, Agricultural Research Service, US Department of Agriculture, Peoria, IL, USA.

Abstract

Yeasts are unicellular fungi that do not form fruiting bodies. Although the yeast lifestyle has evolved multiple times, most known species belong to the subphylum Saccharomycotina (syn. Hemiascomycota, hereafter yeasts). This diverse group includes the premier eukaryotic model system, Saccharomyces cerevisiae; the common human commensal and opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans; and over 1000 other known species (with more continuing to be discovered). Yeasts are found in every biome and continent and are more genetically diverse than angiosperms or chordates. Ease of culture, simple life cycles, and small genomes (∼10-20Mbp) have made yeasts exceptional models for molecular genetics, biotechnology, and evolutionary genomics. Here we discuss recent developments in understanding the genomic underpinnings of the making of yeast biodiversity, comparing and contrasting natural and human-associated evolutionary processes. Only a tiny fraction of yeast biodiversity and metabolic capabilities has been tapped by industry and science. Expanding the taxonomic breadth of deep genomic investigations will further illuminate how genome function evolves to encode their diverse metabolisms and ecologies.

PMID:
26649756
PMCID:
PMC4771062
DOI:
10.1016/j.gde.2015.10.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center