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Nat Commun. 2015 Dec 9;6:8885. doi: 10.1038/ncomms9885.

Long-term neural and physiological phenotyping of a single human.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.
2
Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.
3
Imaging Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.
4
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 63110, USA.
6
Genome Sequencing and Analysis Facility, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.
7
Center for Systems and Synthetic Biology, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.
8
University Medical Center Brackenridge, Austin, Texas 78701, USA.
9
Biomedical Informatics Program, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
10
Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Institute of Living, Hartford, Connecticut 06114, USA.
11
Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06511, USA.
12
South Texas Diabetes and Obesity Institute, University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine, Brownsville, Texas 78520, USA.
13
Texas Biomedical Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas 78227, USA.
14
Center for Neurobiological Imaging, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.
15
Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht 3584 CX, The Netherlands.
16
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.
17
Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.

Abstract

Psychiatric disorders are characterized by major fluctuations in psychological function over the course of weeks and months, but the dynamic characteristics of brain function over this timescale in healthy individuals are unknown. Here, as a proof of concept to address this question, we present the MyConnectome project. An intensive phenome-wide assessment of a single human was performed over a period of 18 months, including functional and structural brain connectivity using magnetic resonance imaging, psychological function and physical health, gene expression and metabolomics. A reproducible analysis workflow is provided, along with open access to the data and an online browser for results. We demonstrate dynamic changes in brain connectivity over the timescales of days to months, and relations between brain connectivity, gene expression and metabolites. This resource can serve as a testbed to study the joint dynamics of human brain and metabolic function over time, an approach that is critical for the development of precision medicine strategies for brain disorders.

PMID:
26648521
PMCID:
PMC4682164
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms9885
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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