Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Amyloid. 2016;23(1):1-7. doi: 10.3109/13506129.2015.1110518. Epub 2015 Dec 8.

Amyloid persistence in decellularized liver: biochemical and histopathological characterization.

Author information

1
a Institute for Liver and Digestive Health .
2
b Wolfson Drug Discovery Unit, Centre for Amyloidosis and Acute Phase Proteins , and.
3
c Centre for Biomedical Science, Division of Medicine, University College London , London , UK .
4
d Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine Section, Developmental Biology and Cancer Programme, UCL Institute for Child Health, Great Ormond Street Hospital, University College London , London UK .
5
e Department of Molecular Medicine , Institute of Biochemistry, University of Pavia , Pavia , Italy , and.
6
f Organ Transplantation Centre and Comparative Medicine Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital , Riyadh , Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Systemic amyloidoses are a group of debilitating and often fatal diseases in which fibrillar protein aggregates are deposited in the extracellular spaces of a range of tissues. The molecular basis of amyloid formation and tissue localization is still unclear. Although it is likely that the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in amyloid deposition, this interaction is largely unexplored, mostly because current analytical approaches may alter the delicate and complicated three-dimensional architecture of both ECM and amyloid. We describe here a decellularization procedure for the amyloidotic mouse liver which allows high-resolution visualization of the interactions between amyloid and the constitutive fibers of the extracellular matrix. The primary structure of the fibrillar proteins remains intact and the amyloid fibrils retain their amyloid enhancing factor activity.

KEYWORDS:

AA amyloidosis; AEF; amyloid; decellularized liver; scaffold

PMID:
26646718
PMCID:
PMC4819572
DOI:
10.3109/13506129.2015.1110518
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center