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Nat Med. 2015 Dec;21(12):1395-9. doi: 10.1038/nm.4004.

Translational strategies in aging and age-related disease.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
2
Translational Gerontology Branch, National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Institutes of Health (NIH), Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
3
Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
4
Institute of Healthy Ageing, Department of Genetics, Evolution, and Environment, University College London, London, UK.
5
Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne, Germany.
6
Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
7
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
8
Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA.

Abstract

Aging is a risk factor for several of the world's most prevalent diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, cancer, cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease. Although our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to the aging process and age-related disease is progressing through the use of model organisms, how to apply this knowledge in the clinic is less clear. In September, Nature Medicine, in collaboration with the Volkswagen Foundation, hosted a conference at the beautiful Herrenhausen Palace in Hannover, Germany with the goal of broadening our understanding of the aging process and its meaning as a 'risk factor' in disease. Here, several of the speakers at that conference answer questions posed by Nature Medicine.

PMID:
26646495
DOI:
10.1038/nm.4004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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