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Int Rev Neurobiol. 2015;125:127-62. doi: 10.1016/bs.irn.2015.09.001. Epub 2015 Nov 6.

Endocannabinoid Mechanisms Influencing Nausea.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Collaborative Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada; Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
2
Department of Psychology, Collaborative Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
3
Department of Psychology, Collaborative Neuroscience Graduate Program, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: parkerl@uoguelph.ca.

Abstract

One of the first recognized medical uses of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol was treatment of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Although vomiting is well controlled with the currently available non-cannabinoid antiemetics, nausea continues to be a distressing side effect of chemotherapy and other disorders. Indeed, when nausea becomes conditionally elicited by the cues associated with chemotherapy treatment, known as anticipatory nausea (AN), currently available antiemetics are largely ineffective. Considerable evidence demonstrates that the endocannabinoid system regulates nausea in humans and other animals. In this review, we describe recent evidence suggesting that cannabinoids and manipulations that enhance the functioning of the natural endocannabinoid system are promising treatments for both acute nausea and AN.

KEYWORDS:

2-Arachidonoylglycerol; Acute nausea; Anandamide; Anticipatory nausea; CB1; Endocannabinoid; Gaping; Illness

PMID:
26638766
DOI:
10.1016/bs.irn.2015.09.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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