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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2016 Jan;24(1):191-9. doi: 10.1002/oby.21314. Epub 2015 Dec 6.

Randomized trial of a prevention intervention that embeds weight-related messages within a general parenting program.

Author information

1
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
2
Obesity Prevention Program, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
4
Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the extent to which an obesity prevention intervention that embeds obesity-related messages within a parenting program, compared with controls who received weekly mailings, resulted in a smaller increase in children's BMI (primary outcome) and improvements in weight-related behaviors from baseline to 9-month follow-up.

METHODS:

Fifty-six families were randomly assigned to the intervention and 56 to control. Children were primarily Hispanic (58%) or Black/African American (23%). Intervention included nine weekly: group parenting sessions, children's sessions, and homework assignments. At baseline, post-intervention, and 9-month follow-up, staff assessed children's weight and height. Parents completed surveys assessing parenting skills, feeding behaviors, and children's weight-related behaviors.

RESULTS:

From baseline to 9-month follow-up, BMI decreased by a mean of 0.13 kg m(-2) among children in the intervention and increased by 0.21 kg m(-2) among children in the control, resulting in a nonsignificant difference (multivariate adjusted difference = -0.36; 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.23, 0.51; P = 0.41). Parents in the intervention decreased restrictive feeding practices relative to control (-0.30; 95% CI -0.53, -0.07; P = 0.01). Intervention and control arms showed similar changes in children's weight-related behaviors.

CONCLUSIONS:

The intervention improved restrictive feeding but did not influence children's BMI or weight-related behaviors compared to controls who received weekly mailings.

PMID:
26638185
PMCID:
PMC4847937
DOI:
10.1002/oby.21314
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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