Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Glia. 2016 Jun;64(6):879-95. doi: 10.1002/glia.22945. Epub 2015 Dec 6.

Pediatric gliomas as neurodevelopmental disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Developmental Neurobiology, St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
2
Department of Pathology, St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.
3
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri.

Abstract

Brain tumors represent the most common solid tumor of childhood, with gliomas comprising the largest fraction of these cancers. Several features distinguish them from their adult counterparts, including their natural history, causative genetic mutations, and brain locations. These unique properties suggest that the cellular and molecular etiologies that underlie their development and maintenance might be different from those that govern adult gliomagenesis and growth. In this review, we discuss the genetic basis for pediatric low-grade and high-grade glioma in the context of developmental neurobiology, and highlight the differences between histologically-similar tumors arising in children and adults.

KEYWORDS:

DIPG; diffuse astrocytoma; glioblastoma; pediatric glioma; pilocytic astrocytoma

PMID:
26638183
PMCID:
PMC4833573
DOI:
10.1002/glia.22945
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center