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Cell. 2015 Dec 3;163(6):1539-54. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.11.008.

The African Turquoise Killifish Genome Provides Insights into Evolution and Genetic Architecture of Lifespan.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Stanford University, California 94305, USA. Electronic address: dario.valenzano@age.mpg.de.
2
Department of Genetics, Stanford University, California 94305, USA.
3
Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Oregon 97403, USA.
4
CMMC, University of Cologne, Cologne, 50931, Germany.
5
Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing, Cologne, 50931, Germany.
6
Cellular Networks and Systems Biology, CECAD, University of Cologne, Cologne, 50931, Germany.
7
Department of Genetics, Stanford University, California 94305, USA; Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging, Stanford University, California 94305, USA. Electronic address: anne.brunet@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Lifespan is a remarkably diverse trait ranging from a few days to several hundred years in nature, but the mechanisms underlying the evolution of lifespan differences remain elusive. Here we de novo assemble a reference genome for the naturally short-lived African turquoise killifish, providing a unique resource for comparative and experimental genomics. The identification of genes under positive selection in this fish reveals potential candidates to explain its compressed lifespan. Several aging genes are under positive selection in this short-lived fish and long-lived species, raising the intriguing possibility that the same gene could underlie evolution of both compressed and extended lifespans. Comparative genomics and linkage analysis identify candidate genes associated with lifespan differences between various turquoise killifish strains. Remarkably, these genes are clustered on the sex chromosome, suggesting that short lifespan might have co-evolved with sex determination. Our study provides insights into the evolutionary forces that shape lifespan in nature.

PMID:
26638078
PMCID:
PMC4684691
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2015.11.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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