Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Front Hum Neurosci. 2015 Nov 19;9:625. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2015.00625. eCollection 2015.

Preservation of Person-Specific Semantic Knowledge in Semantic Dementia: Does Direct Personal Experience Have a Specific Role?

Author information

1
'Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics' laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland ; Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences, Campus Biotech, University of Geneva Geneva, Switzerland.
2
Memory and Cognition laboratory, Institute of Psychology, University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité Boulogne Billancourt, France ; INSERM-UMR-S894, Center of Psychiatry and Neurosciences, Sorbonne Paris Cité, University Paris Descartes Paris, France ; Institut Universitaire de France Paris, France.
3
Memory Resource and Research Centre, Department of Neurology, Rennes University Hospital Rennes, France.
4
École des Hautes Études en Santé Publique, Department of Epidemiology Rennes, France.
5
INSERM, U1077 Caen, France ; UMR-S1077, Université de Caen-Normandie Caen, France ; UMR-S1077, École Pratique des Hautes Études Caen, France ; University Hospital, UMR-S1077 Caen, France.
6
Memory Resource and Research Centre, Department of Neurology, Rennes University Hospital Rennes, France ; INSERM, U1077 Caen, France ; UMR-S1077, Université de Caen-Normandie Caen, France ; UMR-S1077, École Pratique des Hautes Études Caen, France.

Abstract

Semantic dementia patients seem to have better knowledge of information linked to the self. More specifically, despite having severe semantic impairment, these patients show that they have more general information about the people they know personally by direct experience than they do about other individuals they know indirectly. However, the role of direct personal experience remains debated because of confounding factors such as frequency, recency of exposure, and affective relevance. We performed an exploratory study comparing the performance of five semantic dementia patients with that of 10 matched healthy controls on the recognition (familiarity judgment) and identification (biographic information recall) of personally familiar names vs. famous names. As expected, intergroup comparisons indicated a semantic breakdown in semantic dementia patients as compared with healthy controls. Moreover, unlike healthy controls, the semantic dementia patients recognized and identified personally familiar names better than they did famous names. This pattern of results suggests that direct personal experience indeed plays a specific role in the relative preservation of person-specific semantic meaning in semantic dementia. We discuss the role of direct personal experience on the preservation of semantic knowledge and the potential neurophysiological mechanisms underlying these processes.

KEYWORDS:

autobiographical memory; famous names; personal experience; personally familiar names; self; semantic dementia; semantic memory

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center