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Support Care Cancer. 2016 Jun;24(6):2403-10. doi: 10.1007/s00520-015-3043-8. Epub 2015 Dec 3.

It's all good on the surface: care coordination experiences of migrant cancer patients in Australia.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. joanne.shaw@sydney.edu.au.
2
Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), Chris O'Brien Lifehouse (C39Z), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. joanne.shaw@sydney.edu.au.
3
School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
4
Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), Chris O'Brien Lifehouse (C39Z), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
5
School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
6
St George Hospital, South Eastern Sydney Local Health, Sydney, Australia.
7
Prince of Wales Hospital, South Eastern Sydney Local Health, Sydney, Australia.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Migrants diagnosed with cancer in Australia have high unmet need and poorer psychosocial outcomes than comparable Australian-born patients. It is possible that migrants also experience worse coordination of their cancer care. The purpose of this study was to describe migrant patients' experience of care coordination to inform the development of items for inclusion in a cancer care coordination questionnaire sensitive to the specific cultural needs of these patients.

METHODS:

Eighteen Chinese (Mandarin and Cantonese), Arabic and Macedonian patients and carers from two metropolitan cancer centres in Sydney, Australia, were recruited. Two focus groups and 11 telephone interviews were conducted in the participants' own language. A semi-structured interview format was utilised to qualitatively explore participants' experiences of cancer care coordination during treatment. Themes were identified using a thematic analysis.

RESULTS:

Cancer care was generally perceived to be well coordinated. Four themes were identified that impacted on the quality of care coordination as a direct result of a patient's migrant status: (1) the impact of language on understanding and information access, (2) the role of interpreters and (3) access to services and (4) understanding the roles and responsibilities of the team.

CONCLUSIONS:

Despite their care generally being well coordinated, migrants require additional assistance such as information in a form appropriate to their language proficiency and understanding of the new health system. Development of a culturally specific measure of cancer care coordination will enable evaluation of future strategies to improve care.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Care coordination; Focus groups; Interviews; Migrants

PMID:
26634560
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-015-3043-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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