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Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2016 Jan-Feb;38:59-64. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2015.10.006. Epub 2015 Oct 26.

Assessment of psychosocial factors and predictors of psychopathology in a sample of heart transplantation recipients: a prospective 12-month follow-up.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Institut de Neuropsiquiatria i Addiccions, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain. Electronic address: 39639rsg@gmail.com.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Institut de Neurociències, Hospital Clínic i Provincial de Barcelona, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
3
Department of Cardiology, Heart Transplantation Division, Instituto Clínico del Tórax, Hospital Clínic i Provincial de Barcelona, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Institut de Neuropsiquiatria i Addiccions, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Institut de Neurociències, Hospital Clínic i Provincial de Barcelona, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

In the last decades, researchers of heart transplantation (HT) programs have attempted to identify the existence of psychosocial factors that might influence the clinical outcome before and after the transplantation. The first objective of this study is the prospective description of changes in psychiatric and psychosocial factors in a sample of HT recipients through a 12-month follow-up. The second goal is to identify predictors of psychopathology 1 year after HT.

METHODS:

Pretransplant baseline assessment consisted of clinical form; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS); Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Structured Clinical Interview; Coping questionnaire (COPE); Five Factors Inventory Revised; Apgar-Family questionnaire and Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC). The assessment 1 year after HT consisted of HADS, COPE, Apgar-Family and MHLC.

RESULTS:

The sample included 78 recipients. During the waiting list period, 32.1% of them had a psychiatric disorder; personality factors profile was similar to the general population, and they showed adaptive coping strategies. Some changes in psychosocial factors were observed at 12 months after the surgery: lower scores of anxiety and depression, less necessity of publicly venting of feelings and a trend to an internal locus of control. Neuroticism and Disengagement pre-HT were predictors of psychopathology in the follow-up assessment.

CONCLUSIONS:

Pretransplant psychosocial screening is important and enables to find out markers of emotional distress like Neuroticism or Disengagement coping styles to identify patients who might benefit from psychiatric and psychological interventions. Successful HT involved some positive changes in psychosocial factors 12 months after the surgery beyond physical recovery.

KEYWORDS:

Coping; Heart transplantation; Personality; Psychopathology; Psychosocial

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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