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PLoS One. 2015 Dec 3;10(12):e0143303. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0143303. eCollection 2015.

What Are the Major Determinants in the Success of Smoking Cessation: Results from the Health Examinees Study.

Yang JJ1,2, Song M1,2,3, Yoon HS1,2,3, Lee HW1,3, Lee Y1,3, Lee SA4, Choi JY1,3,5, Lee JK6,7, Kang D1,2,3,5.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
2
Institute of Environmental Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Korea.
3
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University Graduate School, Seoul, Korea.
4
Department of Preventive Medicine, Kangwon National University, Kangwon-do, Korea.
5
Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea.
6
JW Lee Center for Global Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.
7
Department of Family Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Understanding mechanisms underlying smoking-related factors should be prioritized in establishing smoking prevention and cessation policy. The aim of this study was to identify factors significantly associated with smoking initiation and/or smoking cessation as well as the most important determinants of successful smoking cessation in a developed non-Western setting. Based on multiple logistic regression models, the odds ratios (ORs) for smoking initiation and cessation were estimated among males (N = 24,490) who had participated in the Health Examinees (HEXA) study. The Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to assess the association between selected predictors of smoking cessation and the likelihood of reaching this goal. Finally, Kaplan-Meier curves were constructed to illustrate the distribution of time from age at smoking initiation to age at smoking cessation. We found that the ORs for successfully quitting smoking increased with age, married status, educational achievement, having a non-manual job, drinking cessation and disease morbidity. Those exposed to secondhand smoking showed less likelihood of quitting smoking. A continual decrease in the ORs for successfully quitting smoking was observed according to increased smoking duration, smoking dose per day and lifetime tobacco exposure (ptrend <0.001). Among the selected predictors, lifetime tobacco exposure, educational attainment, alcohol drinking status and birth cohort were the major determinants in the success of smoking cessation. Our findings suggest that lifetime tobacco exposure, educational attainment, alcohol drinking status and birth cohort can determine success in smoking cessation. Public interventions promoting a smoke-free environment are needed to reinforce discouraging the initiation of, reducing, and quitting cigarette smoking.

PMID:
26633704
PMCID:
PMC4669113
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0143303
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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