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Nature. 2015 Dec 17;528(7582):364-9. doi: 10.1038/nature16192. Epub 2015 Dec 2.

Functional overlap of the Arabidopsis leaf and root microbiota.

Author information

1
Department of Plant Microbe Interactions, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany.
2
Institute of Microbiology, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland.
3
Department of Algorithmic Bioinformatics, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, 40225 Düsseldorf, Germany.
4
Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences (CEPLAS), Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany.
5
Computational Biology of Infection Research, Helmholtz Center for Infection Research, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
6
Max-von-Pettenkofer Institute, Ludwig Maximilian University, German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), partner site LMU Munich, 80336 Munich, Germany.
7
German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), partner site Hannover-Braunschweig, 38124 Braunschweig, Germany.
8
Max Planck Genome Center, Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, 50829 Cologne, Germany.

Abstract

Roots and leaves of healthy plants host taxonomically structured bacterial assemblies, and members of these communities contribute to plant growth and health. We established Arabidopsis leaf- and root-derived microbiota culture collections representing the majority of bacterial species that are reproducibly detectable by culture-independent community sequencing. We found an extensive taxonomic overlap between the leaf and root microbiota. Genome drafts of 400 isolates revealed a large overlap of genome-encoded functional capabilities between leaf- and root-derived bacteria with few significant differences at the level of individual functional categories. Using defined bacterial communities and a gnotobiotic Arabidopsis plant system we show that the isolates form assemblies resembling natural microbiota on their cognate host organs, but are also capable of ectopic leaf or root colonization. While this raises the possibility of reciprocal relocation between root and leaf microbiota members, genome information and recolonization experiments also provide evidence for microbiota specialization to their respective niche.

PMID:
26633631
DOI:
10.1038/nature16192
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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