Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Cell Adh Migr. 2015;9(6):495-501. doi: 10.1080/19336918.2015.1112486.

Histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) promotes the epithelial mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells via up regulation of Snail.

Author information

1
a Hepatobiliary Surgery Department ; The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University ; Guangzhou , China.

Abstract

Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been shown to have antiproliferative activity through cell-cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. Our present study revealed that one HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), can obviously promote in vitro motility of HCT-116 and SW480 cells. VPA treatment significantly down regulates the expression of epithelial markers E-Cadherin (E-Cad) and Zona occludin-1(ZO-1) while up regulates the mesenchymal markers Vimentin (Vim) and N-cadherin (N-Cad), suggesting that VPA can trigger the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of CRC cells. VPA treatment significantly increases the expression and nuclear localization of Snail, the key transcription factors of EMT. Snail knockdown by siRNAs obviously reverses VPA induced EMT of HCT-116 and SW480 cells. Further, VPA can decrease the ubiquitination, increase the acetylation, and then elevate the stabilization of Snail. VPA also increases the phosphorylation of Akt/GSK-3β. The inhibitor of PI3K/Akt, LY2994002, significantly attenuates VPA induced phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3β and up regulation of Snail and Vim. Collectively, our data reveal that VPA can trigger the EMT of CRC cells via up regulation of Snail through AKT/GSK-3β signals and post-transcriptional modification. It suggests that more attention should be paid when VPA used as a new anticancer drug for CRC patients.

KEYWORDS:

Akt/GSK-3β; EMT; Snail; VPA; colorectal cancer

PMID:
26632346
PMCID:
PMC4955961
DOI:
10.1080/19336918.2015.1112486
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center