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Sci Rep. 2015 Dec 3;5:17676. doi: 10.1038/srep17676.

Mating dynamics in a nematode with three sexes and its evolutionary implications.

Author information

1
University of Texas at Arlington, Department of Biology, Arlington, USA.
2
Boyce Thompson Institute and Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.
3
University of Warwick, School of Life Sciences, Coventry, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Nematodes have diverse reproductive strategies, which make them ideal subjects for comparative studies to address how mating systems evolve. Here we present the sex ratios and mating dynamics of the free-living nematode Rhabditis sp. SB347, in which males, females and hermaphrodites co-exist. The three sexes are produced by both selfing and outcrossing, and females tend to appear early in a mother's progeny. Males prefer mating with females over hermaphrodites, which our results suggest is related to the female-specific production of the sex pheromones ascr#1 and ascr#9. We discuss the parallels between this system and that of parasitic nematodes that exhibit alternation between uniparental and biparental reproduction.

PMID:
26631423
PMCID:
PMC4668576
DOI:
10.1038/srep17676
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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