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EBioMedicine. 2015 Sep 2;2(10):1394-404. doi: 10.1016/j.ebiom.2015.08.040. eCollection 2015 Oct.

Risk of All-Cause Mortality in Alcohol-Dependent Individuals: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis.

Author information

1
Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, 43 Boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69100 Villeurbanne, France ; Lundbeck SAS, 37-45, Quai du Président Roosevelt, Issy-les-Moulineaux, 92445 Paris, France.
2
Costello Medical Consulting, City House, 126-130 Hills Road, Cambridge, CB2 1RE, UK.
3
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, 2 Worts' Causeway, Cambridge, CB1 8RN, UK.
4
University Alcohol Treatment Centre, Lausanne University Hospital, Rue du Bugnon 21, 1011 Lausanne, Switzerland.
5
Social and Epidemiological Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, ON M5S 2S1, Canada ; Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College St, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada ; Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie, TU Dresden, Chemnitzer Str. 46, 01187 Dresden, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Alcohol dependence (AD) carries a high mortality burden, which may be mitigated by reduced alcohol consumption. We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis investigating the risk of all-cause mortality in alcohol-dependent subjects.

METHODS:

MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, Embase and PsycINFO were searched from database conception through 26th June 2014. Eligible studies reported all-cause mortality in both alcohol-dependent subjects and a comparator population of interest. Two individuals independently reviewed studies. Of 4540 records identified, 39 observational studies were included in meta-analyses.

FINDINGS:

We identified a significant increase in mortality for alcohol-dependent subjects compared with the general population (27 studies; relative risk [RR] = 3.45; 95% CI [2.96, 4.02]; p < 0.0001). The mortality increase was also significant compared to subjects qualifying for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse or subjects without alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Alcohol-dependent subjects continuing to drink heavily had significantly greater mortality than alcohol-dependent subjects who reduced alcohol intake, even if abstainers were excluded (p < 0.05).

INTERPRETATION:

AD was found to significantly increase an individual's risk of all-cause mortality. While abstinence in alcohol-dependent subjects led to greater mortality reduction than non-abstinence, this study suggests that alcohol-dependent subjects can significantly reduce their mortality risk by reducing alcohol consumption.

KEYWORDS:

Abstinence; Alcohol dependence; Alcoholism; Meta-analysis; Mortality; Systematic review

PMID:
26629534
PMCID:
PMC4634361
DOI:
10.1016/j.ebiom.2015.08.040
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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