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Cancer Res. 2015 Dec 15;75(24):5202-5. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-2077. Epub 2015 Dec 1.

Essential Components of Cancer Education.

Author information

1
Departments of Cancer Biology, Molecular Physiology, and Pathology and The University of Kansas Cancer Center, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas. DWelch@KUMC.edu.
2
Department of Physiology and the Center for Vascular and Inflammatory Diseases, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. Marlene and Stuart Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland.
3
Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine; Miami, FL Sheila and David Fuente Graduate Program in Cancer Biology, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida.
4
Department of Surgery, Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia.
5
Departments of Cancer Biology, Molecular Physiology, and Pathology and The University of Kansas Cancer Center, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas.
6
Departments of Surgery, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology, Indiana University Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana.
7
Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC.
8
Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.
9
Department of Pathology and Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina.
10
Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Carver College of Medicine, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.

Abstract

Modern cancer therapy/care involves the integration of basic, clinical, and population-based research professionals using state-of-the-art science to achieve the best possible patient outcomes. A well-integrated team of basic, clinical, and population science professionals and educators working with a fully engaged group of creative junior investigators and trainees provides a structure to achieve these common goals. To this end, the structure provided by cancer-focused educational programs can create the integrated culture of academic medicine needed to reduce the burden of cancer on society. This summary outlines fundamental principles and potential best practice strategies for the development of integrated educational programs directed at achieving a work force of professionals that broadly appreciate the principals of academic medicine spanning the breadth of knowledge necessary to advance the goal of improving the current practice of cancer care medicine.

PMID:
26627010
PMCID:
PMC4681646
DOI:
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-15-2077
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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