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Sci Rep. 2015 Dec 2;5:17748. doi: 10.1038/srep17748.

Flexion bonding transfer of multilayered graphene as a top electrode in transparent organic light-emitting diodes.

Author information

1
Soft I/O Interface Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-700, Korea.
2
IT Convergence Technology Research Laboratory, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-700, Korea.
3
Smart I/O Control Research Section, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon 305-700, Korea.
4
Department of Energy Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea.
5
IBS Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea.

Abstract

Graphene has attracted considerable attention as a next-generation transparent conducting electrode, because of its high electrical conductivity and optical transparency. Various optoelectronic devices comprising graphene as a bottom electrode, such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics, quantum-dot LEDs, and light-emitting electrochemical cells, have recently been reported. However, performance of optoelectronic devices using graphene as top electrodes is limited, because the lamination process through which graphene is positioned as the top layer of these conventional OLEDs is a lack of control in the surface roughness, the gapless contact, and the flexion bonding between graphene and organic layer of the device. Here, a multilayered graphene (MLG) as a top electrode is successfully implanted, via dry bonding, onto the top organic layer of transparent OLED (TOLED) with flexion patterns. The performance of the TOLED with MLG electrode is comparable to that of a conventional TOLED with a semi-transparent thin-Ag top electrode, because the MLG electrode makes a contact with the TOLED with no residue. In addition, we successfully fabricate a large-size transparent segment panel using the developed MLG electrode. Therefore, we believe that the flexion bonding technology presented in this work is applicable to various optoelectronic devices.

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