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Transl Behav Med. 2015 Dec;5(4):401-14. doi: 10.1007/s13142-015-0341-0. Epub 2015 Sep 16.

A review of diabetes prevention program translations: use of cultural adaptation and implementation research.

Author information

1
Prevention Research Center in St. Louis, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, 621 N. Skinker Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63130 USA.
2
College of Nursing, Department of Health Policy and Administration, Washington State University, 1100 Olive Way Suite 1200, Seattle, WA 98101 USA.
3
Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, 600 S. Euclid, CB 8217, St. Louis, MO 63110 USA.
4
Program in Physical Therapy, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, 4444 Forest Park Avenue, Campus Box 8052, St. Louis, MO 63108 USA.
5
College for Public Health & Social Justice, Saint Louis University, Salus Center, 309, 3545 Lafayette Ave, St. Louis, MO 63104 USA.
6
Research for Indigenous Community Health (RICH) Center, Social and Administrative Pharmacy, Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Practices, University of Minnesota, 232 Life Sciences, 1110 Kirby Drive, Duluth, MN 55812 USA.
7
Prevention Research Center in St. Louis, Brown School, Washington University in St. Louis, 621 N. Skinker Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63130 USA ; Division of Public Health Sciences and Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO USA.

Abstract

The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) has been shown to prevent type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modification. The purpose of this study was to describe the literature on DPP translation, synthesizing studies using cultural adaptation and implementation research. A systematic search was conducted. Original studies evaluating DPP implementation and/or cultural adaptation were included. Data about cultural adaptation, implementation outcomes, and translation strategies was abstracted. A total of 44 were included, of which 15 reported cultural adaptations and 38 explored implementation. Many studies shortened the program length and reported a group format. The most commonly reported cultural adaptation (13 of 15) was with content. At the individual level, the most frequently assessed implementation outcome (n = 30) was adoption. Feasibility was most common (n = 32) at the organization level. The DPP is being tested in a variety of settings and populations, using numerous translational strategies and cultural adaptations. Implementation research that identifies, evaluates, and reports efforts to translate the DPP into practice is crucial.

KEYWORDS:

Cultural adaptation; Diabetes prevention; Implementation; Translation

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