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Adv Exp Med Biol. 2015;883:155-68. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-23603-2_9.

Toward Network Biology in E. coli Cell.

Author information

1
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Naras, 630-0101, Japan. hmori@gtc.naist.jp.
2
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Naras, 630-0101, Japan. takeriki0502@gmail.com.
3
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Naras, 630-0101, Japan. y-otsuka@bs.naist.jp.
4
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Naras, 630-0101, Japan. sbowden@umn.edu.
5
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Naras, 630-0101, Japan. k.yokoyama@hamayaku.ac.jp.
6
Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Naras, 630-0101, Japan. muto@bs.naist.jp.
7
The Biotechnology Institute, University of Minnesota, 1479 Gortner Avenue, St. Paul, MN, 55108-6106, USA. libourel@umn.eud.
8
Department of Biological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47907, USA. blwanner@genetics.med.harvard.edu.

Abstract

E. coli has been a critically important model research organism for more than 50 years, particularly in molecular biology. In 1997, the E. coli draft genome sequence was published. Post-genomic techniques and resources were then developed that allowed E. coli to become a model organism for systems biology. Progress made since publication of the E. coli genome sequence will be summarized.

KEYWORDS:

E. coli; Network biology; Plasmid clone libraries

PMID:
26621467
DOI:
10.1007/978-3-319-23603-2_9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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