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Nat Commun. 2015 Dec 1;6:10062. doi: 10.1038/ncomms10062.

Production of butyrate from lysine and the Amadori product fructoselysine by a human gut commensal.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 10, 6703 HB Wageningen, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Basic Veterinary Medicine, University of Helsinki, Agnes Sjöberginkatu 2, FIN-00790 Helsinki, Finland.
3
Laboratory of Biochemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703 HA Wageningen, The Netherlands.
4
Wageningen NMR Centre, Dreijenlaan 3, 6703 HA Wageningen, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Bacteriology and Immunology, Haartmaninkatu 3, University of Helsinki, FIN-0014 Helsinki, Finland.

Abstract

Human intestinal bacteria produce butyrate, which has signalling properties and can be used as energy source by enterocytes thus influencing colonic health. However, the pathways and the identity of bacteria involved in this process remain unclear. Here we describe the isolation from the human intestine of Intestinimonas strain AF211, a bacterium that can convert lysine stoichiometrically into butyrate and acetate when grown in a synthetic medium. Intestinimonas AF211 also converts the Amadori product fructoselysine, which is abundantly formed in heated foods via the Maillard reaction, into butyrate. The butyrogenic pathway includes a specific CoA transferase that is overproduced during growth on lysine. Bacteria related to Intestinimonas AF211 as well as the genetic coding capacity for fructoselysine conversion are abundantly present in colonic samples from some healthy human subjects. Our results indicate that protein can serve as a source of butyrate in the human colon, and its conversion by Intestinimonas AF211 and related butyrogens may protect the host from the undesired side effects of Amadori reaction products.

PMID:
26620920
PMCID:
PMC4697335
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms10062
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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