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Int J Oral Maxillofac Surg. 2016 Mar;45(3):304-7. doi: 10.1016/j.ijom.2015.10.022. Epub 2015 Nov 23.

Stability of treatments for recurrent temporomandibular joint luxation: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Sergipe at Lagarto, Lagarto, Sergipe, Brazil.
2
Brazilian Army Health Corps, Armed Forces Hospital, Brasília, Brazil.
3
Graduate Program of Applied Health Sciences, Federal University of Sergipe at Lagarto, Lagarto, Sergipe, Brazil.
4
Department of Dentistry, Federal University of Sergipe at Lagarto, Lagarto, Sergipe, Brazil; Graduate Program of Applied Health Sciences, Federal University of Sergipe at Lagarto, Lagarto, Sergipe, Brazil. Electronic address: paulo@bucomaxiloaracaju.com.br.

Abstract

Temporomandibular joint luxation (TMJ) is the excessive anterior translation of the mandibular condyle out of its normal range of movement and away from the glenoid fossa. Once dislocation occurs, the abnormal condylar position generates reflex contractions of the masticatory muscles, which in turn hinder movement of the condyle back to its resting position. Frequent luxation episodes characterize a condition referred to as recurrent TMJ luxation. While there are several surgical and conservative therapeutic options available for recurrent TMJ luxation, a robust, evidence-based rationale for choosing one technique over another is missing. Thus, a systematic review based on the PRISMA statement was proposed in an attempt to determine which therapeutic option results in the longest time to relapse. There is no good quality evidence on which treatment options guarantee the long-term elimination of recurrent TMJ luxation. In cases of post-surgical relapse, eminectomy has often been used as a 'rescue procedure', which may mean that surgeons empirically consider this treatment to be the 'gold standard' for addressing recurrent TMJ luxation.

KEYWORDS:

articular hypermobility; dislocation; review; temporomandibular joint; temporomandibular joint disorders

PMID:
26616027
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijom.2015.10.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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