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Orthop Clin North Am. 2016 Jan;47(1):169-77. doi: 10.1016/j.ocl.2015.08.017.

Immobilization After Rotator Cuff Repair: What Evidence Do We Have Now?

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, 2 Silverstein Pavilion, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.
3
Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. Electronic address: ag112@uw.edu.

Abstract

Recurrent tears after rotator cuff repair are common. Postoperative rehabilitation after rotator cuff repair is a modifiable factor controlled by the surgeon that can affect re-tear rates. Some surgeons prefer early mobilization after rotator cuff repair, whereas others prefer a period of immobilization to protect the repair site. The tendon-healing process incorporates biochemical and biomechanical responses to mechanical loading. Healing can be optimized with controlled loading. Complete load removal and chronic overload can be deleterious to the process. Several randomized clinical studies have also characterized the role of postoperative mobilization after rotator cuff repair.

KEYWORDS:

Early mobilization; Immobilization; Mechanobiology; Postoperative rehabilitation; Rotator cuff repair; Rotator cuff tear; Tendon healing

PMID:
26614931
DOI:
10.1016/j.ocl.2015.08.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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