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J Clin Periodontol. 2016 Jan;43(1):2-9. doi: 10.1111/jcpe.12483. Epub 2016 Jan 18.

Serum vitamin B12 is inversely associated with periodontal progression and risk of tooth loss: a prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Unilever Research and Development, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands.
2
Unit of Periodontology, University Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt University Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
3
Unilever Research and Development, Bebington, UK.
4
Institute for Community Medicine, University Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
5
Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medicine, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
6
Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dentistry, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to investigate the association of serum vitamin B12 with the progression of periodontitis and risk of tooth loss in a prospective cohort study.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

In the Study of Health in Pomerania, 1648 participants were followed from 2002-2006 to 2008-2012 (mean duration 5.9 years). Serum vitamin B12 was measured by chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay. Probing pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured to reflect periodontal status on a half-mouth basis at each survey cycle. Tooth numbers are based upon a full-mouth tooth count.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

In multivariate regression models, baseline vitamin B12 was inversely associated with changes in mean PD (Ptrend = 0.06) and mean CAL (Ptrend = 0.01), and risk ratios of tooth loss (TL; Ptrend = 0.006) over time. Compared to participants in the highest vitamin B12 quartile, those in the lowest quartile had 0.10 mm (95%CI: 0.03, 0.17; Pdifference = 0.007) greater increase in mean PD, 0.23 mm (95%CI: 0.09, 0.36; Pdifference = 0.001) greater increase in mean CAL and a relative risk of 1.57 (95%CI: 1.22, 2.03; Pdifference < 0.001) for TL. Stratified analyses showed stronger associations between vitamin B12 and changes in mean CAL among never smokers (Pinteraction = 0.058). Further studies are needed to understand the potential mechanisms of these findings.

KEYWORDS:

clinical attachment loss; probing depth; smoking; tooth loss; vitamin B12

PMID:
26613385
DOI:
10.1111/jcpe.12483
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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