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Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol. 2015 Jun;29(3):405-23. doi: 10.1016/j.berh.2015.04.001. Epub 2015 May 8.

Shoulder disorders and occupation.

Author information

1
Arthritis Research-UK/MRC Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; Arthritis Research-UK/MRC Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.
2
Arthritis Research-UK/MRC Centre for Musculoskeletal Health and Work, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit, University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. Electronic address: kwb@mrc.soton.ac.uk.

Abstract

Shoulder pain is very common, and it causes substantial morbidity. Standardised classification systems based upon presumed patho-anatomical origins have proved poorly reproducible and hampered epidemiological research. Despite this, there is evidence that exposure to combinations of physical workplace strains such as overhead working, heavy lifting and forceful work as well as working in an awkward posture increases the risk of shoulder disorders. Psychosocial risk factors are also associated. There is currently little evidence to suggest that either primary prevention or treatment strategies in the workplace are very effective, and more research is required, particularly around the cost-effectiveness of different strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Frozen shoulder (adhesive capsulitis); Impingement syndrome; Rotator cuff; Shoulder pain

PMID:
26612238
PMCID:
PMC4836557
DOI:
10.1016/j.berh.2015.04.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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