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Chest. 1989 Jul;96(1):89-91.

Periodic leg movements in sleep following treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Medical College of Pennsylvania, Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute, Philadelphia.

Abstract

Periodic leg movements in sleep are shown to be a common finding in patients with OSA and may become evident or increase in severity after treatment of the OSA with NCPAP. Periodic leg movements in sleep were measured during baseline polysomnography, a NCPAP treatment trial, and a repeat NCPAP recording in 33 patients treated with NCPAP for OSA. During baseline PSG, nine patients had five or more PLMS per hour of sleep (index), while 14 patients had a PLMSI of 5 or more during the NCPAP trial and the repeat NCPAP recording. Among those patients with a PLMSI of 5 or more during repeat NCPAP studies, the PLMSI showed a significant increase from baseline to initial NCPAP (16.9 +/- 25.3 vs 39.3 +/- 29.4; p less than 0.001) and from baseline to repeat NCPAP (16.9 +/- 25.3 vs 42.9 +/- 39.8; p less than 0.05). The number of PLMS associated with electroencephalographic arousal also increased significantly from baseline to initial NCPAP (4.3 +/- 7.4 vs 9.7 +/- 8.9; p less than 0.05) and from baseline to repeat NCPAP (4.3 +/- 7.4 vs 16.5 +/- 18.6; p less than 0.05). The 14 patients with a PLMSI of 5 or more on the repeat NCPAP had significantly more stage 1 sleep and less REM sleep than 19 patients with a PLMSI of less than 5. Bilateral anterior tibialis EMG must be measured during NCPAP recordings in order to recognize sleep disruption caused by PLMS.

PMID:
2661161
DOI:
10.1378/chest.96.1.89
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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