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Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2016 Feb;42(1):103-18, ix. doi: 10.1016/j.rdc.2015.08.011. Epub 2015 Oct 26.

Corticosteroids in Myositis and Scleroderma.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
2
Department of Dermatology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 450 Broadway Street, Pavilion C, Suite 242, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA.
3
Division of Rheumatology and Immunology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, CA 94305, USA; Division of Rheumatology, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, 3801 Miranda Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. Electronic address: Shauwei@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) involve inflammation of the muscles and are classified by the patterns of presentation and immunohistopathologic features on skin and muscle biopsy into 4 categories: dermatomyositis, polymyositis, inclusion body myositis, and immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. Systemic corticosteroid (CS) treatment is the standard of care for IIM with muscle and organ involvement. The extracutaneous features of systemic sclerosis are frequently treated with CS; however, high doses have been associated with scleroderma renal crisis in high-risk patients. Although CS can be effective first-line agents, their significant side effect profile encourages concomitant treatment with other immunosuppressive medications to enable timely tapering.

KEYWORDS:

Corticosteroids; Glucocorticoids; Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies; Morphea; Myositis; Scleroderma; Systemic sclerosis

PMID:
26611554
PMCID:
PMC5481159
DOI:
10.1016/j.rdc.2015.08.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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