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Epilepsy Behav. 2016 Jan;54:1-6. doi: 10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.10.024. Epub 2015 Nov 25.

Factors contributing to the development of perceived stigma in people with newly diagnosed epilepsy: A one-year longitudinal study.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Pusan, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Neurology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: salee@amc.seoul.kr.
3
Department of Neurology, Bong-Seng Memorial Hospital, Pusan, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Neurology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Neurology, Kepco Medical Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Neurology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Neurology, CHA University, Seongnam, Republic of Korea.
8
Department of Neurology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Republic of Korea.
9
Department of Neurology, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju, Republic of Korea.
10
Department of Neurology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
11
Department of Neurology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We evaluated the course of perceived stigma and the factors associated with perceived stigma over the first year in newly diagnosed people with epilepsy (PWE).

METHODS:

We recruited newly diagnosed PWE from 12 tertiary hospitals in Korea. The perceived stigma of epilepsy was assessed using the Stigma Scale at baseline and one year later. At the time of diagnosis, demographic, clinical seizure-related, and psychological data were collected. The predictive factors for perceived stigma over one year were analyzed using logistic regression analyses.

RESULTS:

Two hundred eighteen newly diagnosed PWE were included at baseline, and 153 completed the study. The percentage of participants who felt stigmatized decreased from 30.7% at the time of diagnosis to 17.6% at the end of follow-up. Introverted personality and a high level of anxiety were independent factors contributing to stigma at the time of epilepsy diagnosis. At the one-year follow-up, introverted personality and lower economic status were predictive of the development of perceived stigma.

CONCLUSION:

Introverted personality was an important factor contributing to the development of perceived stigma at the time of diagnosis and at one year after diagnosis. In addition, a high level of anxiety and a low economic status were independently related to feelings of stigma at baseline and at one year after diagnosis, respectively. There may be a decrease in the perception of stigma over one year in newly diagnosed PWE.

KEYWORDS:

Anxiety; Depression; Epilepsy; Introverted personality; Newly diagnosed; Stigma

PMID:
26610094
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2015.10.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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